Sunday, January 12, 2014

Should Governments Negotiate With Terrorists?


Photo Credit: Israel Defence Forces



Jonathan Powell, the long-term Downing Street Chief of Staff, who played a central role in the peace talks, says it is essential to secure an open line of communication with terrorists. He suggested that western governments should consider entering talks with al-Qaeda and the Taliban by applying the tactics used successfully in the Northern Ireland peace deal.
By The priority of governments after a terrorist attack is to ensure the safety of the population, stabilize the state, and make sure that no other attacks will follow. Debates about whether governments should enter talks with terrorists produce a lot of heat, but a unanimous decision is never reached, mainly because of the emotional aftershock of an attack.
Those arguing against negotiating with terrorists claim that democracies should never give in to violence, and that terrorists should be punished for using it. It is argued that negotiation talks would only give legitimacy to terrorists, and would undermine the political actors who have tried to reach conflict resolution through peaceful measures. And aside from weakening international efforts to reduce the incidence of terrorism, negotiations can set a dangerous precedent.
However, democratic governments often negotiate with terrorist groups.
Read more [HERE].

No comments:

Post a Comment