Thursday, October 9, 2014

Hostage Negotiations and Crisis Intervention Phase I & II


Instructor: Jack Cambria

 Introduction/Orientation: This opening block of instruction includes instructor and class self-introductions and an overview of the class curriculum, historical context of negotiations, provided materials and suggested readings. This portion of the training will be presented in lecture format.


Required/Suggested Equipment: This block of instruction is intended to make the student aware of the required equipment that is necessary on any hostage or barricaded response. It will also serve to alert commanders of what equipment is available. The equipment presented includes the hostage phone (demonstrated in Phase 2 0/ P.A. c. T training), response vehicles, ballistic equipment, identifying raid jacketslhats, fiber optic cameras and listening devices, department radio tactical channels, amongst others. This portion of the training will be presented in lecture and power point format.

Fundamentals of Hostage Negotiation: Students will receive general theoretical concepts on hostage negotlatlOns that include the three different types of response incidents, the reason law enforcement agencies negotiate, emotion verses rationality, managing an incident, profiles of hostage-takers and hostages, negotiator selection, time management; amongst others. This portion of the training will be presented in lecture and power point and video format.

Active Listening: Students will receive information on listening techniques used in hostage or crisis negotiations. They will understand the basic concepts of actively listening and restating or paraphrasing what they heard in their own words, confirming that they heard and understood the message being stated. This portion of the training will be presented in lecture and power point and video format.

Legal Issues: This block of instruction will give the student an understanding of the various court cases that have laid the legal foundation for hostage negotiations in the United States. Precedent setting cases, such as Downs verses the United States (1971), U.S. verses Crosby (1983), N.Y. verses Quarles (1984), and others, will be discussed in giving awareness and avoiding civil liability issues. This portion of the training will be presented in lecture and power point format.

Tactical Communications: This block of instruction will assist the student in developing rapport-building strategies by examining the five-core principles of managing emotion. This portion of the training will be presented in lecture and power point format. Read more
October 20 - 24, 2014
Wyomissing, Pennsylvania

..... Register

No comments:

Post a Comment